If you have land in the Colne Valley and want some trees, talk to us.

Last winter we planted over 5000 trees!

Saturday, 27 June 2009

Holme Bank Wood

Guy and Philip search the jungle, lots of small birch that the Society  planted can
be seen on the other side of the clough behind Guy.

Holme Bank Wood this morning, for more bracken bashing and stake and guard retrieval. Very warm and midgy up there, lovely views of the reservoirs though. This site is an ongoing attempt to add to semi-ancient woodland on the edge of the Reservoirs. There is some seriously deep bracken up there though, so we need to keep going back to get light to the smaller trees. Some of the birch look like they have some kind of blight, but others look ok so far. Some birch are self seeding on the rockier parts of the hillside. Rowan is also self seeding, and a few small oak.

Guy thinks there is lots of scope for further planting here and the other side of the reservoirs.

                                   That's Duncan wrestling with a stake under a bush                      

 

And that's me with my midge net on, demonstrating how not to remove a guard.

Saturday, 20 June 2009

Marsden Green fair - publicity and recruitment


Philip considers adopting a minimum height requirement for Society volunteers.

Today we were at the annual Marsden green fair at the Mechanics Institute. Philip and I set up our stall at 10.00, and then we took turns to host the stall and hand out leaflets to visitors. We had several useful conversations with prospective volunteers, and also with people who may have sites for us to plant on. My mum helped out as well and had a fine old time. I got to talk to one of the Society's founder members Dr. Dransfield, who must in his late eighties now.

Tilly got her face painted, we won wine in the raffle, and my mum talked to anyone and everyone. 

Saturday, 13 June 2009

Hemplow, Butterly and Rams Clough - a bit of everything


One of our valiant little trees struggling against the evil bracken at Hemplow Wood. Nice view of the reservoir though.

A typical summer mornings work. We took walk round Butterly reservoir, checking on the progress of some of last seasons planting, and trees from two or three years ago. We collected some old stakes and guards for recycling, we knocked back a bit of bracken to allow smaller trees to get some light, we cleared the footpath of fallen trees in the pine plantation, and we ended the morning by going up Rams Clough to persuade some sheep to leave one of our planting sites. A pleasant mornings work, good breeze so no midges. My feet were a bit sore from all the walking though. The damp weather has made it incredibly lush up there.

Guy and Philip do their best catalogue poses, modelling society t-shirts.